My Foray Into Food Storage

A regular gal learning about Food Storage, Home Cooking, Canning, Gardening, and more!


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Best Whole Grain Dinner Rolls Ever!

Remember when I posted my friend’s Best Ever Dinner Roll recipe?  (See it here.)  Well, I love a good whole grain roll, and I can’t seem to leave well enough alone, so I adapted Jenna’s awesome recipe and replaced some of the white flour with whole grain wheat flour, quinoa, and flax seed.  I’ve tried a few different versions, and the one I made today is the best so far.  In fact, I made these to give to my son’s teachers for teacher appreciate week, and I’m mourning the loss of my rolls.  I’m not completely depressed, but these are pretty yummy, and I will DEFINITELY make them again soon.  So, without further ado, here’s the recipe.

 

Best Whole Grain Dinner Rolls Ever!  With Freshly ground Winter White Wheat Flour, Quinoa, and Flax seed.

Best Whole Grain Dinner Rolls Ever! With Freshly ground Winter White Wheat Flour, Quinoa, and Flax seed.

 

Best Whole Grain Dinner Rolls Ever!

Adapted from a recipe by Jenna Livingston

 

2 cups almost hot water

2 tablespoons yeast

3/4 cup sugar

1/2 cup quinoa, uncooked

1/4 cup flax seed

1 cup whole wheat flour (I used white wheat flour)

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

2 cups bread flour (you can use all-purpose if you don’t have bread flour)

1 tablespoon dough enhancer (rounded)

1 stick salted butter, softened

1 teaspoon salt

1 egg, beaten

 

Combine warm water with 2 tablespoons yeast and a little of the sugar, and set aside letting the yeast proof.  Next, using a coffee grinder or seed mill, grind your raw quinoa and flax seed.  Set aside.

 

When yeast is bubbly, it is proofed and ready to use.  Add yeast mixture to your mixing bowl along with the remaining sugar, ground quinoa and flax seed, wheat flour, and 1 1/2 cup of all-purpose flour.  Mix well.  Add softened butter, egg, and salt.  Mix until combined.  Add remaining flour and dough enhancer, and mix until the flour is incorporated.  If you have a stand mixer, turn mixer to medium and let it knead the dough for about 5 minutes (until it springs back when you touch it).  If you are kneading by hand, knead until the dough springs back when you touch it (10 minutes or so).

 

Cover and set dough aside to rise until it doubles in size.  Using one half of the dough at a time, shape into rolls.  Let rise again until the rolls are puffy.  This takes a little longer with whole grain rolls, so be patient.  It took about 25 minutes for mine to get puffy.  Bake in a preheated 400 degree oven for 12-15 minutes or until cooked through and lightly browned.  Brush with butter, if desired.

 

And here’s my photo step-by-step.

 

Ingredients assembled except for the dough enhancer.  Not sure what dough enhancer is?  Check out my post about it here.

Ingredients assembled except for the dough enhancer. Not sure what dough enhancer is? Check out my post about it here.  I’d already ground my flax seed and quinoa in a coffee grinder.  I bought this one from Amazon, and it does a great job, especially considering I spent less than $11 on it!

 

First, I prepared my yeast to "proof" by adding the yeast and a little sugar to the almost hot water.  I let it sit for about 5 minutes, and it looked like this.  See?  It's foamy on the top.  That means the yeast is good and ready to use.

First, I prepared my yeast to “proof” by adding the yeast and a little sugar to the almost hot water. I let it sit for about 5 minutes, and it looked like this. See? It’s foamy on the top. That means the yeast is good and ready to use.

 

I poured my yeast mixture into a bowl containing the ground quinoa, ground flax seed, whole wheat flour, and 1 cup of flour.

I poured my yeast mixture into a bowl containing the ground quinoa, ground flax seed, whole wheat flour, and 1 cup of flour.

 

After mixing for a few minutes, I added the softened butter, egg, and salt to the bowl and mixed until everything was well combined.

After mixing for a few minutes, I added the softened butter, egg, and salt to the bowl and mixed until everything was well combined.

 

I added the remaining flour and mixed on low until all the flour was incorporated.

I added the remaining flour and mixed on low until all the flour was incorporated.

 

The dough was a tiny bit too wet, so I added another 1/4 cup of all-purpose flour and mixed well.  Once everything was incorporated, I turned the mixer to medium and let it knead the dough for about 5 minutes.

The dough was a tiny bit too wet, so I added another 1/4 cup of all-purpose flour and mixed well. Once everything was incorporated, I turned the mixer to medium and let it knead the dough for about 5 minutes.

 

This picture is a little dark (sorry), but I wanted you to see what the dough looked like after kneading.  When I pressed into the dough, it "sprang" back.  So, I covered it and set it in a warm spot to rise.  It took a little under one hour to double in size.

This picture is a little dark (sorry), but I wanted you to see what the dough looked like after kneading. When I pressed into the dough, it “sprang” back. So, I covered it and set it in a warm spot to rise. It took a little under one hour to double in size.

 

Once it had doubled, I was ready to form the dough into rolls.  I use 1/2 of the dough at a time and form "crescents."  Take a look...

Once it had doubled, I was ready to form the dough into rolls. I use 1/2 of the dough at a time and form “crescents.” Take a look…

 

PLEASE NOTE - This is not the same dough, but I used the same process.  Divide the dough in half and put one half on your floured surface.  Turn it over so there's flour on both sides.

PLEASE NOTE – This is not the same dough, but I used the same process. Divide the dough in half and put one half on your floured surface. Turn it over so there’s flour on both sides.

 

Roll out the dough into a rough circle.  It doesn't really matter if it's an exact circle, so don't stress about it.  My circle was great today, but many days it looks more like an oblong round or like a rectangle.  The rolls taste the same regardless of how they look.

Roll out the dough into a rough circle. It doesn’t really matter if it’s an exact circle, so don’t stress about it. My circle was great today, but many days it looks more like an oblong round or like a rectangle. The rolls taste the same regardless of how they look.

 

Using a pizza cutter, cut the dough into 16 pieces.  Sometimes I do a few more, depending on how evenly I split the dough.

Using a pizza cutter, cut the dough into 16 pieces. Sometimes I do a few more, depending on how evenly I split the dough.

 

It's super easy to make a fancy crescent shape.  Jenna (I just LOVE her!) showed me this trick.  Pick up one of your triangular shaped pieces of dough.  Rest the wide side of the triangle on your two index fingers.  Then flip the dough in a circular motion around your fingers.

It’s super easy to make a fancy crescent shape. Jenna (I just LOVE her!) showed me this trick. Pick up one of your triangular shaped pieces of dough. Rest the wide side of the triangle on your two index fingers. Then flip the dough in a circular motion around your fingers.

 

It will look something like this.  Place the dough with the tip facing down onto a greased pan.

It will look something like this. Place the dough with the tip facing down onto a greased pan.

 

All the rolls are "rolled" and ready to rise.  I let them sit for about 25 minutes until they were getting a bit puffy.  Then I put them in a 450 degree preheated oven, but I turned the temperature down to 400 immediately after putting them in the oven.  I wanted to make sure the rolls had a big burst of heat to make them light and tender.

All the rolls are “rolled” and ready to rise. I let them sit for about 25 minutes until they were getting a bit puffy. Then I put them in a 450 degree preheated oven, but I turned the temperature down to 400 immediately after putting them in the oven. I wanted to make sure the rolls had a big burst of heat to make them light and tender.

 

And here they are!  Don't they look delectable?  I brushed the tops with some melted, salted butter immediately after removing them from the oven.

And here they are! Don’t they look delectable? I brushed the tops with some melted, salted butter immediately after removing them from the oven.

 

And they were ready to serve!

And they were ready to serve!

 

My son’s teachers are getting these today along with some of Jenna’s original Best Dinner Rolls Ever (recipe here) and some homemade jam.  Homemade gifts are certainly the best!  I put time and love into these just as my son’s teachers put their time and love into teaching him.  I am so grateful for all they do!

Think you’d like these lovely dinner rolls? 

Or do you have another homemade gift you love to give or receive?

 

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What Happened When I Made Up A Recipe? Wheat, Flax, and Chia Bread!

You know how I said that I make my own bread?  Well, I do.  Most of the time.  Last week, it was really crazy, so I picked up some Oroweat at Costco for the boys.  They were quite happy, but did say that they like my bread better for “just eating,” meaning not for sandwiches or toast.  Buying bread for the boys allowed me to freedom to experiment with bread making this week, because I didn’t have to deal with complaints or “the look.”  They have their super, non-nutritious white bread, and I can experiment with super uber healthy whole grain bread.

 

As much as I love bread, I have some dietary restrictions, so I have to seriously limit how much I eat.  There’s a little more flexibility when I eat a true whole grain bread, so I decided to make some this week.  I pulled out my family cookbook (Thank you Erin for assembling this as a Christmas gift a few years ago), and looked at the wheat bread recipes.  They looked good, and I’m sure they were good, as they were my mother’s recipes, but they all made several loaves of bread.  I wasn’t sure if anyone else would eat the wheat bread, and I wanted to start small.

 

Rather than doing the smart thing and simply reducing the amount of ingredients and making less bread, I decided to wing it and completely change my favorite white bread recipe and make it a whole grain bread recipe.  That’s a risky thing to do!  But I am a “wing it” kind of gal.

 

Shall we see how “winging it” turned out this time?

 

Whole Grain Bread with Flax and Chia Seed.

(Adapted from Pound-it-Bread by Joan Miller)

 

1/2 cup raw honey (can use regular honey)

1 tablespoon molasses

2 tablespoons yeast

1/4 cup cream (or half-n-half, milk, evaporated milk, almond milk, etc.)

1 3/4 cup warm, not hot, water

1/4 cup flax seed, ground

1/4 cup chia seed

2 1/2 cups bread flour

2 cups whole wheat flour

1 tablespoon dough enhancer

1/4 cup vital wheat gluten

2 tablespoons salted butter, melted

2 teaspoons salt

 

Dissolve yeast in warm water mixed with some of the honey, and let sit for 5 minutes.  It should begin to “bloom” (see picture below).  Put remaining ingredients in bowl and add yeast when ready.  Mix well until all ingredients are moist and forms a ball.  Dump dough onto a floured surface and cut in half.  Form two lumps of dough.  Let them sit and rest for 15 – 20 minutes.  Pound each dough lump for one minute on a floured surface with a rolling pin.  Form into a loaf and put into a greaseed pan.  Let dough sit in pan and rise until the loaf is 1 inch over the top of the pan.  Place bread in preheated 400 degree F oven and bake for 10 minutes.  Place a piece of foil over the top of the loaves and cook for an additional 15-20 minutes, until done.  Total baking time is 25-30 minutes.

 

Now for the fun part…  The pictures!

 

Ingredients.  Well, most of them.

Ingredients. Well, most of them.  See my little ziplock bag of whole wheat flour?  I used my Nutrimill to grind it*  from white winter wheat about a month ago.  I keep it in my freezer to keep it fresh, and I pull it out whenever I need whole wheat flour.

 

Can't forget these babies!

Can’t forget these babies!

 

Or these!

Or these!

 

Or these...

Or these…  Chia seed and ground flax seed

 

I ground 1/4 cup of flax seed in a coffee grinder.  It measured a little over 1/4 cup after I ground it, but I put the entire amount in the dough.

I ground 1/4 cup of flax seed in a coffee grinder. It measured a little over 1/4 cup after I ground it, but I put the entire amount in the dough.

 

Now, we can begin!!

 

Start with the yeast.  Dissolve it into the water mixed with some of the honey.  When the yeast has "bloomed," it will look like this.  When it does, it's ready!

Start with the yeast. Dissolve it into the water mixed with some of the honey. When the yeast has “bloomed,” it will look like this. When it does, it’s ready!

 

Now, add everything to your mixing bowl.  I use a Kitchen-aid.  You can use a Bosch or whatever mixer you have, or you can mix it by hand.

Next, add everything to your mixing bowl. I use a Kitchen-aid. You can use a Bosch or whatever mixer you have, or you can mix it by hand.  This is a heavy dough, so make sure your mixer can handle dough before you begin.

 

Mixing.  I think it needs a little more flour (as I initially only put in 2 cups of bread flour), so I added 1/2 cup of bread flour.

Mixing.  This needed a little more flour (as I initially only put in 2 cups of bread flour), so I added an additional 1/2 cup of bread flour (making 2 1/2 cups total as listed in the recipe).

 

And it turned out like this.  This dough is not as wet as my white bread recipe.

And it turned out like this. This dough is not as wet as my white bread recipe.

 

Dumped it on a floured countertop.

Dumped it on a floured counter top.

 

 

Cut it in half and let it sit for a little over 15 minutes.

Cut it in half and let it sit for a little over 15 minutes.

 

Here is the same dough 15 minutes later.  See?  It's beginning to rise.

Here is the same dough 15 minutes later. See? It’s beginning to rise.

 

I pounded it out.

I pounded it out.

 

Then I shaped it into a loaf, but as you can see, it's not very pretty.  Is it?  I should have just rolled up the dough to form the loaf, but I shaped it the way I do with a wetter dough.  Next time, I'll roll it for a prettier loaf.

Then I shaped it into a loaf, but as you can see, it’s not very pretty. Is it? I should have just rolled up the dough to form the loaf, but I shaped it the way I do with a wetter dough. Next time, I’ll roll it for a prettier loaf.

 

Here's the other one.   Better, but not beautiful.

Here’s the other one. Better, but not beautiful.

 

I let them rise for close to 40 minutes.  They look better now, but, still, they're not pretty.

I let them rise for close to 40 minutes. They look better now, but, still, they’re not pretty.

 

Here they are 10 minutes into baking.  I put foil on top to keep the loaves from getting too brown.

Here they are 10 minutes into baking. I put foil on top to keep the loaves from getting too brown.  And boy!  It’s time to clean my oven!

 

Here they are, fresh out of the oven.

Here they are, fresh out of the oven.

 

Not bad, but not the prettiest bread I've ever made.  Of course, taste is king, so let's see how it turned out.

Not bad, but not the prettiest bread I’ve ever made. Of course, taste is king, so let’s see how it turned out.

 

The texture of the bread was really nice, but it is a tad bit too sweet (even for me and I like a sweeter bread).  I forgot to account for the fact that honey is twice as sweet as sugar.  I adjusted for it's water content, but not the sweetness.

The texture of the bread was really nice, but it is a tad bit too sweet (even for me and I like a sweeter bread). I forgot to account for the fact that honey is twice as sweet as sugar. I adjusted for it’s water content, but not the sweetness.

 

Overall, a decent bread.  Not my favorite, but definitely edible.  I’ll continue to tweak this recipe and let you know what I come up with.  I will most definitely be reducing the amount of honey.

 

If you’re interested in the nutritional content, here’s what “My Net Diary” told me.  Each slice has 150 calories, 4 grams of fat, 23 grams of carbs (with 4 of those from fiber), and 6 grams of protein.

 

What do you think? 

Do you have a favorite whole grain bread recipe?  I’d love it if you’d share it with me!

 

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